Sir Robert FitzRoger, Knight, 2nd Baron of Warkworth

Male 1161 - Bef 1214  (~ 53 years)


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  • Name Robert FitzRoger 
    Title Sir 
    Suffix Knight, 2nd Baron of Warkworth 
    Born ~ 1161  (Warkworth, Northumberland, England) Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Died Bef 22 Nov 1214  (Warkworth, Northumberland, England) Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3
    Person ID I46105  The Hennessee Family
    Last Modified 27 Apr 2019 

    Father Roger FitzRichard,   b. 1139, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1178  (Age 39 years) 
    Mother Adeliza de Vere,   b. ~1125, Essex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1185, Saffron Walden, Essex, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 59 years) 
    Married Y  [4
    Family ID F19431  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Margaret de Cheney,   b. ~1162, (Horsford, Norfolkshire, England) Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1214  (Age ~ 52 years) 
    Married Y  [1, 2
    Children 
     1. Alice FitzRoger,   b. 1184-1185, (Warkworth, Northumberland, England) Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1225, (Reading, Berkshire, England) Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 40 years)
     2. John Clavering,   b. Bef 1191,   d. Bef 20 Feb 1241  (Age ~ 50 years)
    Last Modified 24 Sep 2021 
    Family ID F16858  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - ~ 1161 - (Warkworth, Northumberland, England) Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Bef 22 Nov 1214 - (Warkworth, Northumberland, England) Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • Robert fitzRoger was an Anglo-Norman nobleman and Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk.

      FitzRoger was the son of Roger fitzRichard, who held Warkworth and was lord of Clavering, Essex. FitzRoger was sheriff of Norfolk from Michaelmas in 1190 to Easter 1194 and then again from Michaelmas 1197 to Easter 1200.[1] FitzRoger's first appointment as sheriff was due to the influence of William de Longchamp, who was Lord Chancellor. Longchamp's influence also secured custody of Orford Castle for fitzRoger.[2] Longchamp also arranged for fitzRoger to have custody of Eye Castle in Suffolk.[3] When Longchamp fell from royal favour and was replaced by Walter of Coutances, fitzRoger was one of the few of Longchamp's appointments to retain his office of sheriff.[4]

      FitzRoger had confirmation of his ownership of Warkworth in 1199 and in 1205 was granted Newburn and the barony of Whalton in Northumberland. Warkworth and Newburn occasionally were considered baronies, but not consistently.[5] FitzRoger also held Clavering from Henry of Essex for one knight's fee.[6][a] FitzRoger's holdings were extensive enough that he was considered a baron during the reigns of King Richard I[7] and King John of England.[8]

      FitzRoger married Margaret,[9] one of the daughters and heiresses of William de Chesney, the founder of Sibton Abbey.[10] Margaret was one of three daughters, but she inherited the bulk of her father's estates.[11] Margaret was the widow of Hugh de Cressy.[b] Through Margaret, Roger gained the barony of Blythburgh in Suffolk.[13] He also acquired lands at Rottingdean in Sussex from Margaret.[14]

      FitzRoger died in 1214, and his heir was his son John fitzRobert, by his wife Margaret.[5][13] Margaret survived fitzRoger and paid a fine of a thousand pounds to the king for the right to administer her lands and dower properties herself.[1]

      Notes

      Jump up ^ Robert fitzRoger who held Clavering should not be confused with a separate Robert fitzRoger who held lands around Calthorpe in Norfolk.[6]
      Jump up ^ Although Margaret was the eldest daughter, she received the bulk of her father's estates as a reward for de Cressy from King Henry II of England. The king arranged Margaret's first marriage as well as ensuring that most of her father's lands went to her.[12]

      Citations

      ^ Jump up to: a b Round "Early Sheriffs of Norfolk" English Historical Review pp. 491494
      Jump up ^ Turner and Heiser Reign of Richard Lionheart p. 116
      Jump up ^ Heiser "Castles, Constables, and Politics" Albion p. 34
      Jump up ^ Turner and Heiser Reign of Richard Lionheart p. 132
      ^ Jump up to: a b Sanders English Baronies p. 150
      ^ Jump up to: a b Keats-Rohan Domesday Descendants p. 953
      Jump up ^ Turner and Heiser Reign of Richard Lionheart p. 103
      Jump up ^ Russell "Social Status" Speculum p. 324
      Jump up ^ Keats-Rohan Domesday Descendants p. 416
      Jump up ^ Keats-Rohan Domesday Descendants p. 370
      Jump up ^ Green Aristocracy of Norman England p. 380
      Jump up ^ Waugh "Women's Inheritance" Nottingham Medieval Studies p. 82
      ^ Jump up to: a b Sanders English Baronies p. 16
      Jump up ^ Loyd Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families p. 35

      References

      Green, Judith A. (1997). The Aristocracy of Norman England. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-52465-2.
      Heiser, Richard R. (Spring 2000). "Castles, Constables, and Politics in Late Twelfth-Century English Governance". Albion. 32 (1): 1936. doi:10.2307/4053985. JSTOR 4053985.
      Keats-Rohan, K. S. B. (1999). Domesday Descendants: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents, 10661166: Pipe Rolls to Cartae Baronum. Ipswich, UK: Boydell Press. ISBN 0-85115-863-3.
      Loyd, Lewis Christopher (1975) [1951]. The Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families (Reprint ed.). Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company. ISBN 0-8063-0649-1.
      Round, J. H. (1920). "The Early Sheriffs of Norfolk". The English Historical Review. 35 (140): 481496. doi:10.1093/ehr/xxxv.cxl.481. JSTOR 552094.
      Russell, Josiah Cox (July 1937). "Social Status at the Court of King John". Speculum. 12 (3): 319329. doi:10.2307/2848628. JSTOR 2848628.
      Sanders, I. J. (1960). English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and Descent 10861327. Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press. OCLC 931660.
      Turner, Ralph V.; Heiser, Richard R. (2000). The Reign of Richard Lionheart: Ruler of the Angevin Empire 11891199. The Medieval World. Harlow, UK: Longman. ISBN 0-582-25660-7.
      Waugh, Scott L. (1990). "Women's Inheritance and the Growth of Bureaucratic Monarchy in Twelfth- and Thirteenth-Century England". Nottingham Medieval Studies. 34: 7192. doi:10.1484/J.NMS.3.182. [2]

  • Sources 
    1. [S9709] "Alice de Warkworth" profile, http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p397.htm#i7188, found in the site, "My.

    2. [S9710] "Robert fitzRoger" biography, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_fitzRoger, accessed and downloaded Setpember 22nd, 20.

    3. [S14033] "John (John II) de Eure formerly Eure", Ancestors, Descendants & Biography, https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Eure-78, abstr.

    4. [S13297] "Joan (FitzPiers) de Verdun (1183 - 1205)", Pedigree, Registry & Biography, https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/FitzPiers-3, a.