Sir William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury

Sir William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury

Male 1176 - 1226  (~ 50 years)

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  • Name William (Plantagenet) Longespee 
    Title Sir 
    Suffix 3rd Earl of Salisbury 
    Born ~ 1176  (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Gender Male 
    Also Known As William Longsword  [2
    Died 7 Mar 1226  Salisbury Castle, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3
    • Roger of Wendover alleged that he had been poisoned by Hubert de Burgh.
    Buried Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    • The cathedral has the tallest church spire in the United Kingdom (123m/404 ft).

      The tomb of William Longesp‚ee was opened in 1791, inside his skull was found the remains of a rat which carried traces of arsenic. The rat is now on display at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum.

      More history and images for Salisbury Cathedral ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salisbury_Cathedral
    Person ID I37358  The Hennessee Family
    Last Modified 7 Mar 2017 

    Father Henry II, King of England,   b. 5 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Jul 1189, Chinon Castle, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 56 years) 
    Mother Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk,   b. <1160, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1185  (Age ~ 25 years) 
    _MARRIED
    _MSTAT Partners 
    Not married
    • she was mother of one of his illegitimate sons, William Longesp‚ee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226)
    Family ID F13837  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury,   b. 0___ 1187, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Aug 1261, Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 74 years) 
    Married 1196  Salisbury, Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [6, 7
    • King Richard arranged for the marriage of his half brother to the young heiress, Ela FitzPatrick, who was Countess of Salisbury in her own right, the daughter of William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury and El‚eonore de Vitr‚e.
    Children 
     1. William Longespee, II, Knight, Earl of Salisbury, Crusader,   b. 1212, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Feb 1250, Al-Mansurah, Egypt Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 38 years)
     2. Richard Longespee,   b. (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Ida Longespee, II,   b. (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Stephen Longespee,   b. ~ 1216, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. ~ 1260  (Age ~ 44 years)
     5. Ida Longespee,   b. 1205-1210, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 0___ 1269, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 59 years)
    Last Modified 23 Oct 2022 
    Family ID F13818  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - ~ 1176 - (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1196 - Salisbury, Wiltshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 7 Mar 1226 - Salisbury Castle, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    burial effigy of William Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury (1176-1226)
    burial effigy of William Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury (1176-1226)

    was an English noble, primarily remembered for his command of the English forces at the Battle of Damme and for remaining loyal to King John. His nickname "Longespée" is generally taken as a reference to his great size and the outsize weapons he wielded.

    He was an illegitimate son of Henry II of England. His mother was unknown for many years until the discovery of a charter William made that mentions "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother).

    24th & 25th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee (1880-1952)

    Tomb of William Longespee in Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
    Tomb of William Longespee in Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England

    He died not long after his return to England at Salisbury Castle. Roger of Wendover alleged that he was poisoned by Hubert de Burgh. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.

    Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
    Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England

    Burial site of William Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury (1176-1226)
    Arms of William Longespee (1176-1226)
    Arms of William Longespee (1176-1226)

  • Notes 
    • William Longesp‚ee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury (c. 1176 Ė 7 March 1226) ("Long Sword", Latinised to de Longa Spatha) was an English noble, primarily remembered for his command of the English forces at the Battle of Damme and for remaining loyal to his half-brother, King John. His nickname "Longesp‚ee" is generally taken as a reference to his great size and the outsize weapons he wielded.

      Early life

      He was an illegitimate son of Henry II, King of England. His mother was unknown for many years until the discovery of a charter William made that mentions "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother).[1][2] This referred to Ida de Tosny, a member of the prominent Tosny (or Toesny) family, who had married Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk[3] in 1181.

      Prior to the discovery of the charter mentioning Countes Ida, speculation and folklore gave Rosamond Clifford, another misress of Henry II, as William's mother. URL https://www.genealogieonline.nl/en/family-tree-fountaine-fontaine-fountain-lafontaine/P2800.php

      King Henry acknowledged William as his son and gave him the honour of Appleby, Lincolnshire, in 1188. Eight years later, his half brother King Richard I married him to a great heiress, Ela of Salisbury, 3rd Countess of Salisbury.

      During the reign of King John, Salisbury was at court on several important ceremonial occasions and held various offices: sheriff of Wiltshire; lieutenant of Gascony; constable of Dover; and Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports; and later warden of the Welsh Marches. He was appointed sheriff of Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire about 1213.

      Military career

      He was a commander in the king's Welsh and Irish expeditions of 1210Ė1212 and was appointed Viceroy of Ireland, jointly with John de Gray, Bishop of Norwich, when the king left for England in 1210.[4] The king also granted him the honour of Eye in Suffolk.

      In 1213, Salisbury led a large fleet to Flanders, where he seized or destroyed a good part of a French invasion fleet anchored at or near Damme. This ended the invasion threat but not the conflicts between England and France. In 1214, Salisbury was sent to help Otto IV of Germany, an English ally, who was invading France. Salisbury commanded the right wing of the army at their disastrous defeat in that year at the Battle of Bouvines, where he was captured.

      By the time he returned to England, revolt was brewing amongst the barons. Salisbury was one of the few who remained loyal to John. In the civil war that took place the year after the signing of the Magna Carta, Salisbury was one of the leaders of the king's army in the south. He was made High Sheriff of Wiltshire again, this time for life. After raising the siege of Lincoln with William Marshall he was also appointed High Sheriff of Lincolnshire (in addition to his current post as High Sheriff of Somerset) and governor of Lincoln castle. However, after the French prince Louis (later Louis VIII) landed as an ally of the rebels, Salisbury went over to his side. Presumably, he thought John's cause was lost.


      Tomb of William Longesp‚ee in Salisbury Cathedral
      After John's death and the departure of Louis, Salisbury, along with many other barons, joined the cause of John's young son, now Henry III of England. He held an influential place in the government during the king's minority and fought in Gascony to help secure the remaining part of the English continental possessions. He was appointed High Sheriff of Devon in 1217 and High Sheriff of Staffordshire and Shropshire in 1224. Salisbury's ship was nearly lost in a storm while returning to England in 1225, and he spent some months in refuge at a monastery on the French island of R‚e.

      Death

      He died not long after his return to England at Salisbury Castle. Roger of Wendover alleged that he was poisoned by Hubert de Burgh. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.

      William Longesp‚ee's tomb was opened in 1791. Bizarrely, the well-preserved corpse of a rat which carried traces of arsenic, was found inside his skull.[5] The rat is now on display in a case at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum.[5]

      Likeness

      A terracotta statue of Longesp‚ee, dating from 1756, is located in the Great Hall of Lacock Abbey in Lacock, Wiltshire, England. A likeness of his wife Ela is also on display, while several other statues are believed to show their children.

      Family

      By his wife Ela, Countess of Salisbury, he had four sons and six daughters:[6]

      William II Longesp‚ee (1212?Ė1250), who was sometimes called Earl of Salisbury but never legally bore the title because he died before his mother, Countess Ela, who held the earldom until her death in 1261.

      Richard, a canon of Salisbury.

      Stephen (d. 1260), who was seneschal of Gascony and married Emeline de Ridelsford, widow of Hugh de Lacy, 1st Earl of Ulster. Their two daughters were Eleanor Longspee, who married Sir Roger La Zouche and Emeline Longspee, who married Sir Maurice FitzMaurice, Justiciar of Ireland.

      Nicholas (d. 1297), bishop of Salisbury.

      Isabella Longesp‚ee, who married Sir William de Vesci.

      Ela Longesp‚ee, who first married Thomas de Beaumont, 6th Earl of Warwick, and then married Philip Basset. No issue.[7]

      Ida Longesp‚ee, married firstly Ralph who was son of Ralph de Somery, Baron of Dudley, and Margaret, daughter of John Marshal;[7] she married secondly William de Beauchamp, Baron of Bedford, by whom she had six children, including Maud de Beauchamp, wife of Roger de Mowbray.[8]

      Ida II de Longesp‚ee (she is alternatively listed as William and Ela's granddaughter: see notes below), married Sir Walter FitzRobert, son of Robert Fitzwalter, by whom she had issue including Ela FitzWalter, wife of William de Odyngsells. Ela's and Williams's grandsons include William de Clinton and John de Grey.[7]

      Mary Longesp‚ee, married. No issue.[7]

      Pernel Longesp‚ee.

      * [4, 8]
    • William Longesp‚ee was the illegitimate son of the first Plantagenet king, Henry II and Ida de Tosny, a member of the Tosny (or Toesny) family. The epithet "Longesp‚ee" ,or Longsword is a reference to his great size and the huge weapons he wielded.

      Ida de Tosny was a royal ward who became the mistress of King Henry II. The first evidence of contemporary information about Ida came to light in 1979 with the publication in the of two charters found in the Bradenstoke Priory Cartulary where he mentions "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother), until then, it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous and more famous mistress of King Henry II's, was William's mother. Four years after William's birth, in 1181, Ida de Tosny was married to Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, by whom she had a number of children.

      King Henry II readily acknowledged William as his son and in 1188 granted him the honour of Appleby in Lincolnshire. Following the death of his father in 1189, his half brother King Richard I 'the Lionheart' succeeded to the throne, William began his successful military career by fighting alongside his half brother in Normandy.

      King Richard arranged for the marriage of his half brother to the young heiress, Ela FitzPatrick, who was Countess of Salisbury in her own right, the daughter of William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury and El‚eonore de Vitr‚e.

      Richard died of a crossbow wound at Chalus, near Limoges in 1199 to be succeeded by his younger brother, King John, William held various offices during John's reign, sheriff of Wiltshire; lieutenant of Gascony; constable of Dover; and Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports; and later warden of the Welsh Marches. He was appointed sheriff of Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire about 1213.

      William LongswordWilliam took part in John's Welsh and Irish expeditions of 1210-1212. In 1213, Salisbury led a large fleet to Flanders, where he seized or destroyed a good part of a French invasion fleet anchored at or near Damme, then the port of Bruges, thus temporarily ending the French invasion threat.

      In 1214, Salisbury was dispatched to aid John's nephew and ally, Otto IV of Germany, in his invasion of France. Salisbury commanded the right wing of Otto's army at their disastrous and decisive defeat in that year at the Battle of Bouvines, where he was taken prisoner by the French.

      William returned to England to find the barons in revolt against John, he was one of the few who remained loyal to his unpopular half brother. In the civil war that broke out the year after the signing of the Magna Carta, William served as one of the leaders of the king's army in the south. Along with William Marshall he raised the siege of Lincoln, but after Prince Louis of France, son and heir of the John's arch enemy French King Philip II 'Augustus' landed in England in alliance with the rebels, Salisbury, assuming John's cause now lost, deserted him and went over to the rebels.

      William LongswordWhile retreating before this incursion, King John died of dysentry at Newark on the wild stormy night of 18th October, 1216, leaving England in a state of anarchy and civil war. His nine year old son Henry was crowned King Henry III of England at the Abbey Church of Gloucester with a circlet belonging to his mother Isabella of Angouleme, since his father had previously lost the royal treasure in the Wash.

      After the defeat of Louis, Salisbury joined the cause of John's young son Henry. By 1218, the English and French signed the Treaty of Lambeth, which agreed that the French prince Louis would surrender his claims to the English throne.

      William held an influential place in the government during the young king's minority and fought in Gascony to help secure the remaining remnant of the once great Angevin Empire in France. He fell sick after campaigning in Gascony in 1226. Salisbury's ship was nearly lost in a storm while returning to England, and he spent some months in refuge at a monastery on the French island of R‚e.

      William Longesp‚ee died on 7 March 1226 at Salisbury Castle soon after his return to England. Roger of Wendover alleged that he had been poisoned by Hubert de Burgh. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral of which he had been a benefactor. His eldest son William succeeded to the title Earl of Salisbury, His widow, Ela, Countess of Salisbury lived on until 1261 and was buried in Lacock Abbey.

      The tomb of William Longesp‚ee was opened in 1791, inside his skull was found the remains of a rat which carried traces of arsenic. The rat is now on display at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum.

      * [2]
    • More history and images for Sir William ... http://bit.ly/1FlUhIj

      More history and images for Salisbury Cathedral ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salisbury_Cathedral

      * [3, 9]

  • Sources 
    1. [S51605] http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I7486&tree=00&parentset=0&generations=5.

    2. [S7022] William Longesp‚ee (circa 1176 - 7 March 1226), http://www.englishmonarchs.co.uk/plantagenet_78.html.

    3. [S51645] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Longesp%C3%A9e,_3rd_Earl_of_Salisbury.

    4. [S12108] "William Longesp‚ee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury (c. 1176 - 7 March 1226)" biography, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Lo.

    5. [S7438] "Lord Robert Fitz Roger DE CLAVERING, 5th Baron Warkworth, 1St Baron Clavering" biography, http://knight-france.com/gene.

    6. [S51647] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ela,_Countess_of_Salisbury.

    7. [S7853] "Ela of Salisbury, 3rd Countess of Salisbury (1187 - 24 August 1261)" biography, http://bit.ly/1NHo3xh.

    8. [S10597] "William Longesp‚ee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury (c. 1176 - 7 March 1226)" biography, which was abstracted, downloaded and pub.

    9. [S51649] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salisbury_Cathedral.